141. Coming On Home Soon by Jacqueline Woodson

January 4, 2010 at 8:43 pm 2 comments

Retell: Ada Ruth can’t wait for her mom to return home from Chicago.  The story takes place during World War II.  Ada Ruth’s mother has gone North to seek jobs on the railroad.  With help from her grandmother and her new feline friend, Ada Ruth is able to wait patiently for her mom to come on home.

Topics: goodbyes, World War II, Chicago, family, pets, cats, poverty, hunger

Units of Study: Historical Fiction, Talking and Writing About Texts, Social Issues

Tribes: personal best

Reading Skills: inference, prediction, interpretation

Writing Skills: tucking in details about setting, zooming in on small moments

My Thoughts: This is a great text to read aloud during an Historical Fiction unit.  It’s a useful text for modeling how readers think about symbolism (or alternatively how writers incorporate symbolism).  For example, it would be helpful to point out the meaning of the kitten in the story.  One could read the story without giving much thought about the kitten’s importance.  However, upon closer reading, one could read into the kitten’s significance.  Perhaps the kitten is a symbol that represents Ada Ruth’s hope that her mother will write soon.  Perhaps the kitten symbolizes her loneliness.

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Entry filed under: African-American Authors, Female Authors, Picture Books. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

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2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. melissa  |  January 6, 2010 at 3:42 pm

    Kittens are very important. I try not to underestimate them.

    Reply
  • 2. Colleen  |  January 25, 2010 at 6:02 pm

    One of my all time favorite books to use when teaching inference and interpretation. SO glad you included it 🙂

    Reply

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