92. Butterflies for Kiri by Cathryn Falwell

September 27, 2009 at 8:05 pm 1 comment

butterflies for kiriRetell: Kiri loves to paint and draw.  When her Auntie Lu sends her a package of origami paper, Kiri begins teaching herself how to fold a paper butterfly.  She gets to a point where her corners are supposed to match up and tears her paper.  She attempts the butterfly the next day but she is scared that she will tear one of her beautiful papers.  Through practice and persistence Kiri eventually folds a successful butterfly.

Topics: origami, art, paper, diagrams, how-to

Units of Study: Realistic Fiction

Tribes: personal best, appreciations/no put-downs

Habits of Mind: persisting, striving for accuracy, creating-innovating-imagining, thinking flexibly, managing impulsivity, taking responsible risks, remaining open to continuous learning

Writing Skills: including similes, making several drafts before publishing

My Thoughts: I wish I had known about this book years ago when I started a paper crane project with my fourth graders.  We read Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes, folded 1,000 paper cranes, and sent them to a school in Japan who delivered our cranes to the peace memorial in Hiroshima.  When I had started the project, I didn’t realize how difficult paper crane folding would be for that age.  Some students were able to pick it up quickly while others got really frustrated with the process.  Kiri teaches us how to deal with frustration.  She took a break from the project, practiced with other materials, and tackled the project with new energy.  Throughout this book many ‘habits of mind’ are presented.  Even if you don’t plan on doing origami with your class, it’s great to read during the revising process of any Writing unit.

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Female Authors, Picture Books. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

91. What’s So Bad About Gasoline? Fossil Fuels and What They Do by Anne Rockwell 93. Who Pooped in the Zoo? Exploring the Weirdest, Wackiest, Grossest and Most Surprising Facts About Zoo Poop by Caroline Patterson

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Cathryn  |  December 30, 2009 at 1:24 am

    What a pleasure to know that a teacher “gets” this book, and knows how to use it for more than origami. There’s a bit of autobiography in Butterflies for Kiri. I, too, struggled with perfection, was afraid of using precious materials, and needed to find new paths for my creativity in order to free my imagination.
    Thanks for your comments, and for your wonderful blog.
    What lucky students you have!
    Best wishes,
    Cathryn Falwell

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Feeds

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


%d bloggers like this: