Posts tagged ‘field trips’

64. What a Day it Was at School! by Jack Prelutsky

what a day it was at schoolRetell: A collection of silly school poems on topics such as:  homework, field trips and farting.

Topics: school, homework, field trips, libraries, food chain, history, poetry, partnerships

Units of Study: Fantasy, Authoring an Independent Reading Life

Tribes: mutual respect

Habits of Mind: responding with wonderment and awe

Writing Skills: incorporating rhythm and rhyme

My Thoughts: The poems in this collection are very, very silly–perfect for those ‘just for fun’ read alouds I mentioned yesterday.  I think I’ll read, “I Made a Noise This Morning” (a poem about a student farting in class) when my students need a quick laugh.  Though this collection is probably more suitable for younger grades, a few of the poems could be good hooks for mini-lessons or project launches.  I’m planning on sending home more independent project ideas in Science and Writing.  When I launch this project I may read Prelutsky’s “Homework” which describes a gooey experiment that didn’t go as planned.  There is a cute poem entitled, “A Classmate Named Tim,” that I think I’ll use when introducing partnerships.

August 29, 2009 at 9:00 am Leave a comment

56. What Joe Saw by Anna Grossnickle Hines

what joe sawRetell: Joe is always lagging behind the class.  His teacher and his classmates are always telling him to hurry up.  It’s not until a classmate stops to tie his shoes that he realizes why Joe keeps falling behind.

Topics: school, field trips, discovery, curiosity

Units of Study: Realistic Fiction, Talking and Writing about Texts

Tribes: appreciations/no put-downs, mutual respect

Habits of Mind: responding with wonderment and awe

Reading Skills: interpretation, inference

Writing Skills: using repetition, dialogue

My Thoughts: The main character in this book reminds me of my sweetheart.  When we’re on route somewhere he always stops to smell the flowers on butterfly bushes or picks fruit from trees.  If I’m in a hurry it can be frustrating at first, but most of the time it’s worth it to be a few minutes late.  I appreciate how he makes me slow down and notice the world around me.  What Joe Saw is a good book to read when you want your class to discuss the importance of paying attention to small details.  However, you may not want to read this book to your class just before going on a field trip.  It may be good to read during an interpretation unit.  I can imagine having interesting discussions about the  individual vs. the group.

August 22, 2009 at 2:57 am Leave a comment

35. One Green Apple by Eve Bunting

one green appleRetell: One Green Apple is the story of Farah, a Muslim immigrant, who struggles to fit in.  Despite the language barrier she manages to make friends and participate during the field trip to the apple orchard.

Topics: immigration, language barrier, dupatta, field trips, friendship, Muslim characters

Units of Study: Social Issues, Talking and Writing About Texts, Realistic Fiction

Tribes: mutual respect, right to pass

Reading Skills: interpretation, inference, empathy

Writing Skills: including metaphors, using sensory details

My Thoughts: I wish I knew about this book last year.  I had two students who recently came from China.  Other students were having difficulty communicating with them.  They got frustrated when the Chinese students didn’t understand their rapid speech.  The Chinese students got frustrated when people spoke too loud to them and ‘dumbed material down’.  I intend to use this book to address language issues.  In the story Farah thinks to herself, “I understand.  It’s not that I am stupid.  It is just that I am lost in this new place.”  I can see using this book as a mentor text for teaching about metaphors.  You could discuss Eve Bunting’s decision to make Farah choose a green apple rather than a red apple like the others.

July 31, 2009 at 9:00 am Leave a comment


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