Posts tagged ‘baseball’

137. When Lightning Comes in a Jar by Patricia Polacco

Retell: Patricia Polacco describes a fun-filled family reunion where the adults challenge the kids to baseball games, the aunties make meatloaf and jello salads, and everyone catches fireflies.

Topics: reunions, family, baseball, curiosity, storytelling, fireflies, tradition, parties

Units of Study: Memoir, Personal Narrative

Reading Skills: envisionment, interpretation

Writing Skills: incorporating sensory details, storytelling

My Thoughts: When planning read alouds, I have been trying to create text sets, planning books not just by unit of study, but by themes.  I’m thinking of creating a text set with the theme of ‘traditions’ which may include  When Lightning Comes in a Jar, The Keeping Quilt, and When the Relatives Came.  This book could also be great to read when you are teaching students to storytell to their partners.  Storytelling is a Polacco family reunion tradition.

Advertisements

November 30, 2009 at 9:10 am Leave a comment

119. Full Count: A Baseball Number Book by Brad Herzog

full countRetell: A numerical version of his alphabet book H is for Home Run.

Topics: baseball, numbers, Hall of Fame, Women’s League, tee ball, bat boys, Yogi Berra, Joe Nuxhall, Jackie Robinson, Little League, multiplication

Units of Study: Nonfiction, Content Area

Writing Skills: incorporating rhyme and rhythm

My Thoughts: I now have yet another genre to think about when we get to the Content-Area unit:  Number Books.  This is one number book that fourth graders will find to be quite interesting.  Full Count follows the same format as its alphabet companion book–a rhyming poem accompanies a more detailed expository explanation of the content behind the rhyme.  This book has an added bonus of having illustrations that can support a unit on multiplication.  The illustration for 25, shows five groups of five baseball bats.  The illustration for 50, shows 10 groups of five jerseys.  If you use the TERC math curriculum you may want to use this book for the Ten-Minute Math activity, Quick Images.

October 26, 2009 at 8:14 pm Leave a comment

111. Roberto Clemente: Pride of the Pittsburgh Pirates by Jonah Winter

roberto clementeRetell: This is the rags-to-riches story of Roberto Clemente.  Not only was he an all-star player for the Pittsburgh Pirates, he was also a humanitarian who donated a great deal of his earnings to charity.

Topics: baseball, Puerto Rico, racism, poetry

Units of Study: Nonfiction, Social Issues, Content-Area

Tribes: personal best, mutual respect

Habits of Mind: persisting, thinking flexibly, striving for accuracy

Reading Skills: inference, interpretation, envisionment

Writing Skills: including similes, using commas in lists

My Thoughts: I like sports stories that emphasize the athlete’s character rather than just his/her athletic ability.  This is a good book for showing persistence even in the face of adversity.  The book describes how Clemente grew up playing baseball with a glove made out of a coffee-bean sack and baseballs made from old soup cans.  Written in free verse but organized into two line stanzas, this is a great book to read as a model for students writing nonfiction poetry during the Content-Area unit.

October 17, 2009 at 9:00 pm Leave a comment

106. H is for Home Run: A Baseball Alphabet by Brad Herzog

h is for home runRetell: Brad Herzog celebrates the A to Zs of baseball.

Topics: baseball, Babe Ruth, Jackie Robinson

Units of Study: Nonfiction, Content-Area

Reading Skills: envisionment, determining importance

Writing Skills: using alliteration, using dashes, crafting rhyme

My Thoughts: I normally don’t use alphabet books very much throughout the course of the year.  This book inspires me to change my mind.  This book is more sophisticated than your average alphabet book.  Each page has both a rhyming description of an aspect of baseball and a more detailed description in the sidebar.  I’m considering proposing alphabet books as a way to publish Content-Area pieces.  During Social Studies students could make alphabet books as a way to assess their understanding of the content of a unit.

Often I’m scrambling to find read alouds that fit within one of our units of study.  However, sometimes it’s nice to read something that will connect with a current event or a current class interest.  For those who want to celebrate the upcoming World Series, H is for Home Run is a good choice.

October 11, 2009 at 9:48 pm 1 comment


Feeds

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


%d bloggers like this: